The Swim

(1964)


Introduction

The Swim is a 1960s novelty dance in which the dancers imitate a variety of swim strokes.


The Dance

Overhand Crawl: Bring right hand straight forward (1), and hold (2, 3, 4). Repeat with left hand [DB65]. Or do it double time, two counts per stroke [HB66].

Back Stroke: Raise right hand straight up (1), and circle it down behind you (2, 3, 4). Repeat with left hand [DB65]. Or do it double time, two counts per stroke [HB66].

Breast Stroke: Bring both hands forward (1), and open them out to the sides (2, 3, 4). Repeat [DB65]. Or do it double time, two counts per stroke [HB66].

Side Stroke: Swing right arm forward, palm facing out (1), and carry arm to side (2, 3, 4). Repeat with left arm [DB65].

Dog Paddle or Mud Crawl: Circling forearms around each other (toward body), bring right arm down sharply (1), then circle forearms quickly (2, 3, 4). Repeat with left arm [DB65].

Underwater: Hold nose with right hand, raise left hand, bend knees and slowly lower yourself in a rhythmic jerk, swinging knees side to side until almost sitting on the floor. "A good way to end the dance" [DB65].


The "footwork" for the Swim is the Frug, repeatedly popping the hip out to the side [DB65, HB66].


The Music

"C'Mon and Swim" (1964) by Bobby Freeman is an appropriate choice.


Sources


© 2020 Nick Enge


For more, see our two books on dancing:
Waltzing: A Manual for Dancing and Living (2013) by Richard Powers and Nick Enge,
and Cross-Step Waltz: A Dancer's Guide (2019) by Richard Powers and Nick & Melissa Enge.


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